After a devastating year for children, UNICEF Executive Board considers increasing the emergency fund

The number and scale of humanitarian emergencies in 2014 made it an unprecedented year in UNICEF’s work to meet the needs of children and families affected by crisis. As UNICEF’s Executive Board gathered at the start of its first regular session of 2015, Member States considered the growing number and complexity of emergencies, the lessons UNICEF learned from the preceding year and how those insights may be applied to provide even more timely and effective humanitarian aid. In a top-agenda item, the Board considered how UNICEF can continue to have sufficient funds available when a situation quickly deteriorates, facilitating stronger operational capacity to respond to crises.

Screenshot of "After a devastating year for children, UNICEF Executive Board considers increasing the emergency fund" by Kristin Taylor for UNICEF

A grim year for children

2014 was a devastating year, in which too many children around the world found themselves caught in emergencies with no end in sight. This photography essay captures the crises—from armed conflicts and natural disasters to the unprecedented Ebola outbreak—that undermined children’s ability to access healthcare, attend school, and play, and threatened their very survival.
UNICEF photography essay on 2014 grim year for children by Kristin Taylor

In addition to appearing on the UNICEF Photography homepage, the essay was also featured front and center on the homepage of UNICEF’s global website.

UNICEF photography essay on 2014 grim year for children by Kristin Taylor featured on UNICEF homepage

Layers of loss: An interview with photojournalist Kate Holt on South Sudan

I had the opportunity to interview photojournalist Kate Holt about her documentation of the effects of resurgent violence in South Sudan that began in December 2013. More than four months later, at the time of the interview, the fighting continued to undermine the fundamental rights of children and to deprive them of their homes, their loved ones and the lives they once knew. Read the full interview here.

Screenshot of "Layers of loss: An interview with photojournalist Kate Holt on South Sudan" by Kristin Taylor